The Hunger Games

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After weeks of teaching English and seeing numerous girls reading this trilogy during silent reading time, I decided it was time for me to beginThe Hunger Games. I am always slightly sceptical about books/series of books that receive such hype, especially as I was recently left disappointed by a certain Swedish thriller series that receives a lot of press, so I think I have been putting off picking up this book, despite purchasing it months ago for this very reason. I need not have worried, I loved The Hunger Games and found it difficult to put down my kindle and actually do some school work.

For those who have yet to read this, see the film, or who have avoided hearing people rave about this series, The Hunger Games is set in a futuristic version of America; a rebellion has torn the country apart and many are living in poverty and still being punished for events from decades ago. The country is ruled by the Capitol, and each year as a reminder of the dangers of defying the Capitol, The Hunger Games are staged; a fight to the death between two children from each district of the country – think Battle Royale and you pretty much have it.

The Hunger Games follows the journey of Katniss Everdeen, a teenage/popular fiction heroine I can actually admire and who does things on her terms, but showing great humanity and emotion in such a difficult and challenging situation. I wanted to read about her journey and continued to do so out of a connection to the characters and not because I felt I should finish the book to see what all the hype is about. I am so happy there is actually a female character in popular teenage fiction who is strong, determined and resourceful, kind and intelligent. I am sure there are people out there who can name many who fit this criteria, but after a certain vampire/dark romance series giving off the whole obsessively in love, ‘I must marry him as soon as I finish school or my life will be over’ vibe, it is great that there is a balance. Not that I am crazily feminist, but I like to think we have moved on from girls only wanting to get married. Now I realise I might have shot myself in the foot here as I haven’t read the next two books, but I am praying the trilogy ends in a fitting and believable way, which so far i am sure it will; I hate an anti-climatic ending, especially one where it appears the author has chickened out of killing any major characters!

For now it is back to school work and baking, currently attempting to make jam!

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