Classics Club Spin #5 Howards End

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I am a few days late, but I have finished my Classics Club Spin book at last. As you can see from the picture I enjoyed it and Rupert enjoyed nibbling it.

Howards End follows the lives of the cultured and intelligent Schlegal sisters and their encounters with the Wilcoxes, a family obsessed with prosperity and helping themselves, and Leonard Bast, a young man on the brink of poverty and ruin. Throughout the novel we witness how the three families interact and the impact they all have on one another’s lives.

It is weird to think that the world of Howards End is over a hundred years old and that it is a world that has no knowledge of the upcoming First World War and the impact this will have on all classes and all ideas of social mobility. The novel deals with the idea that there will always be rich and poor classes and that regardless of how hard you work or the advice you take there is a thin line between the survival and ruin, and unfortunately it is usually the same people who suffer; those who leave behind their rural roots in the hope of striking it big in the city. It is also strange to remember that women were simply possessions and ornaments for men to parade around and how any women who showed an ounce of intelligence or independence would be viewed as suspicious.

Overall I would say Howards End was a good read, I can’t say it was one of my favourite reads and it didn’t really have me rushing home eager to read it, but I am glad that I did and that it is another book off the list.

Challenges
The Classics Club
Reading the Twentieth Century

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2 thoughts on “Classics Club Spin #5 Howards End

  1. I went through a Forster phase in my early twenties and read most of his books. My two favourites were A Room With a View and Passage to India, if that helps you with what to try next.
    ARWAV didn’t feel as bleak as HE.
    APTI was quite a challenging read at times, but I found it be worth the effort…and it set me off on an Indian literature phase 🙂

    1. Thank you! I think it might be awhile until I pick up another of his books as HE is the only one I own and I have too many unread books, but I know the other two are on one of my reading lists. I did hear some of an interesting discussion on Forester on the radio a few days ago, so maybe I will try APTI when I can.

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